237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft1

Recap of notes, key points, quotes of importance

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See The World. London: Pelican, 2015. 1-27. Print

  • Blue Marble image 1972 (Apollo 17) – perspective and connectivity
  • Blue Marble image 2012 (NASA) – Tiled rendering
  • Hodhise, “Untitled”, selfie.
  • Universal medium of internet, power of the internet, the quantity, and the geographic extent
  • Global network’s main use is the sharing of photographs, videos, comics, art and animations. World connectivity.
  • Capturing and sharing moments with images is an effort to understand the changing world surrounding us and where we belong in it.
  • There are both the visible and invisible aspects
  • Active engagement creates change

  • “emerging global society is visual”. Mirzoeff. 6.
  • “Permanent revolution”. Mirzoeff. 7.
  • “Visual culture; a culture of the visual” Mirzoeff. 11.
  • “our bodies are now extensions of data networks, clicking, linking, and taking selfies” Mirzoeff. 14
  • “All media, are social media” Mirzoeff. 14.
  • “Flexible zone of viewing” Mirzoeff. 19.
  • “Time bases media” Mirzoeff. 26.
  • “attempt to try capture change itself” Mirzoeff. 16.

 

Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. “Introduction”. Practices Of Looking; An Introduction To Visual Culture.: New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 1-5 Print.

  • difference between reality and media portrayal
  • images are home to the expression of culture and social interaction as well as “complexly saturated text” Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. 1. = faster info, creates routine looking rather than critical looking.
  • Visual texts = expression, representation, politics, info, provocation, leisure and entertainment
  • interpretation of visual texts depends on memories and experiences from other parts of our lives
  • Visual media helps us make sense of society
  • Fluidity across different medias
  • Symbolism
  • Dynamics of looking
  • “Both a connecting force and a source of conflict around the world” on images. Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. 1.
  • “Culture is a process” Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. 4.
  • “Modes of responding to visuality” Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. 5.
  • “Deciphering and re-deploying visual media” Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. .5.

 

Clarke, Michael. “Language and Meaning.” Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. Lausanne, Switzerland: A V A Publishing, 2007. 20-27

  • Naming; identification, descriptive
  • Listening; creating appropriate responses
  • Contextualising; Specific conditions. “locate it in a particular time and place” Michael. 25. Understanding, appreciation
  • Analysing
  • Interpreting; explanation of the meaning
  • Evaluating; amount of worth

– “our need to articulate in words our response to this overwhelming visual culture” Clarke, Michael. 21.

 

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. “Critical Thinking.” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

  • Exposure to other people’s ideas can enhance our own thinking, maybe even change it
  • Importance of creative and imaginative thinking creates the unexpected
  • Examination of arguments helps build reasoning
  • Reflection on what you’re doing and why
  • Role of language and culture
  • Words in the wrong context can be misleading
  • “ The world is shaped and constrained by knowledge” Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. 47.
  • Creative thinking; new perspectives/possibilities
  • Analysing; Inspection
  • Problem solving; “systematically considering all possible solutions” Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. 46.
  • Reasoning; sensible connections
  • Evaluating; examine points put forward and determine the usefulness and reasoning.

 

Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson ed. N.Z., 2009. 15-39. Print.

  • Looking critically; Actively consider and engage, resemblance, and associations.
  • When, where, why, what, who, how we look at images?
  • Strong concepts in work will allow new ideas
  • “Broadening your experience of images increases your ability to situate or contextualise any one image in terms of its relation to others”. Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. 18.

 

Works cited;

 

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See The World. London: Pelican, 2015. 1-27. Print

Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. “Introduction”. Practices Of Looking; An Introduction To Visual Culture.: New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 1-5 Print.

Clarke, Michael. “Language and Meaning.” Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. Lausanne, Switzerland: A V A Publishing, 2007. 20-27 

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. “Critical Thinking.” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson ed. N.Z., 2009. 15-39. Print.

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237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft1

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