237.130_A2_W4_Task 3A_Written Response

Mirzoeff puts into question how we image identity and “the self”. The selfie represents a new era, it has become the visual signature of the 21st century (32). In reference to the traditional painted portrait, the way we represent ourselves and how we want to be seen has shifted over time, Mirzoeff questions how art expresses identity. Through the increase of visual media, the fusion of self-image and the self-portrait creates a digital performance that reshapes the perception of ourselves and others (33). In an era of sharing and intense visual communication, we have moved past speech.

It is important to understand where the selfie originates from and the context is was created in as it stems from a period of transformation. Expressive art sparked gender, race and class movements, it was a symbol of change. The significance of how we represent ourselves and how others see us will only increase due to the rise of mass visual media. By observation and analysis we can gain a glimpse into just how important representation and perception is.

toulouse-lautrec-self-portrait-1882.jpgToulouse-Lautre. Self-Portrait Before a Mirror. Digital image. Self-portrait of the Artist. N.p., 1882. Web. 10 Apr. 2016.

 

Toulouse-Lautre, Self-Portrait Before a Mirror, 1882 exemplifies Mirzoeffs idea of identity representation and authoring. Toulouse “had an adult upper body but legs of a child” Mirzoeff 48, but here his disability is masked by being left out of the frame. How you represent yourself has a direct influence on how others perceive you. Toulouse by authoring the self-portrait in the mirror was able to identify with someone of the norm, not with a “freak” 48.

Works cited

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “How to see yourself”. How to see the World. London. Pelican, 2015. 63, Print.

Toulouse-Lautre. Self-Portrait Before a Mirror. Digital image. Self-portrait of the Artist. N.p., 1882. Web. 10 Apr. 2016.

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237.130_A2_W4_Task 3A_Written Response

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