237.130_A1_W3_Task 4_Option A_Writing Response

Reading comprehension: Walker’s perspective regarding Maori’s in academia is both powerful and heartbreaking, discussing the reality of being Maori in a “predominantly Pakeha institution” and the “bicultural supervision” going on in our education systems. Walker struggles to reach out to her preferred audience through writing, she describes her audience as “the Maori who will never get to university”. To create change is often a difficult and rare task, yet here Walker is writing not as a Maori, but hundreds, in hope to eliminate inequality and discrimination. Walker, Sheilagh, 153-154.

The author’s voice: Walker is passionate but frustrated, her efforts to legitimate Maori in academia seem to have gone unnoticed. The personal pronouns “i” and “my” are repetitively used as she is sharing her own individual experience, the abundant use of Maori words throughout the text allow a small insight into her world, words such as “wharewhui”, “korero”, and “Kaupapa” display her knowledge and culture. Walker, Sheilagh, 153. There is a strong personal position present right from the beginning, the continuous use of “struggle” is an indicator of what reality is like for Walker. “Anyway, aren’t I relevant?” Walker, Sheilagh, 154. The use of rhetorical question act as notes for Walker herself, they are a reminder of her cause. The text overall I found was easy to understand, but the underlying messages were often complex in meaning, the excerpt raises awareness about ongoing Maori inequality in universities.

Works cited

Walker, Sheilagh. “Chapter seven: Conclusion. Notes to myself: Writing from the gut”. Kia tau the rangimārie: Kaupapa Māori theory as a resistance against the construction of Māori as other. Auckland University: Unpublished Masters thesis (excerpt), 1996. 153-154. Print.

 

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237.130_A1_W3_Task 4_Option A_Writing Response

237.130_A1_W1_Task 3_Reading Reflection

  • Digital divide, Mirzoeff writes about this in relevance to connectivity. It’s strange to think in 2012 we had already increased the world’s internet access by a staggering 566% since the 2000’s, America and Europe are no longer the only ones connected 45% of users are based in Asia. In saying this there are still major regions going without internet access, the sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) and Indian sub-continent for example. In a world where everything is wired and connected, not having access to such a global network like the internet, it ends up creating a digital divide. When connectivity is such a large part of my life and needless to say my peers as well, it’s hard to imagine a time where I can’t send a Snapchat, Google Maps a location or Facebook Messenger a friend.
  • Universal medium is a way to communicate without language barriers or distance barriers, it is a medium that can be understood globally. Mirzoeff describes our emerging global society, as a visual society, we universally communicate on a basis of photographs and videos. If you count all the times you have been informed through a photo or video via the internet, it probably adds up to more than all the information you’ve learnt through all the other channels of communication e.g. books, lectures etc. Thinking about all the images and videos that go viral within hours exemplifies the power of the universal medium; the global web.

 

Works cited

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See the World. London: Pelican. 2015. 6-10. 8/03/16.

237.130_A1_W1_Task 3_Reading Reflection

237.130_A1_W1_Task 3_Glossary

Tiled Rendering; The construction of digital imagery by putting multiple snapshots together to build the big picture. NASA’s Blue Marble 2012, appears to be have been photographed in one place all at the same time. However, it’s actually a composition of different images, it still appears to be coherent and equal to reality.

Universal medium; A communication channel that transcends through modern day barriers such as the language and distance barrier. Mirzoeff describes the internet’s visual database as a universal medium as it is accessible and understood on a global scale. 

Works cited

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See the World. London: Pelican. 2015. 8.03.16

237.130_A1_W1_Task 3_Glossary

237.130_A1_W1_Task 2_What is Critical Thinking

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Daehyun Kim (Moonassi)

Critical thinking is about sorting information in order of relevance to the topic at hand while still remaining rational and clear. It helps uncover underlying truths as it allows us to think below just the surface. Critical thinking affects the way we see and hear things as it often increases or decreases the value we hold for them, allowing us to make important decisions. It also guides and focuses our imagination into areas that we think are significant, allowing us to imagine options that may have been dismissed without the added focus critical thinking provides. It also allows us essentially to ignore all counterproductive things and focus on those which hold priority. Critical thinking is a form of thinking that enhances our decision-making.

237.130_A1_W1_Task 2_What is Critical Thinking

237.130_A1_Week 1_Task 1_Influences And Aspirations

The kind of artist/designer I want to be;

Artwork_by_El_Lissitzky_1919

El Lissitzky, propaganda poster “Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge”,  1919. Web. 5.03.16

El Lissitzky has heavily influenced me to experiment with geometrical shapes and spatial relationships as well as varying perspectives when designing.

Continue reading “237.130_A1_Week 1_Task 1_Influences And Aspirations”

237.130_A1_Week 1_Task 1_Influences And Aspirations

237.130 Week 1. Biography of A.Wu

This is a pursuit to find beauty in the mundane.

As a young and naive creative from suburban East Auckland, it’s hard not to be driven by curiosity. I am of Chinese descent and the youngest sibling in a family of 4. Quentin Tarantino films, Salvador Dali sketches, and festivals interest me, as well as a good thrift shop down Cuba St. I value good company, good food, and good art. I’m most curious about the design of everyday things we stumble across unknowingly, whether it’s the poster in the bus stop or the app icon on our phones, it’s always remained a mystery to me how the best designs can communicate so subtly but still have such a powerful impact. My previous work focuses a lot on sociocultural evolution, especially the gender equality gap. Throughout my college years, I played football and eventually became captain of the school team, in my last year I picked up underwater hockey in a spur of the moment thing, never regretted it though. After leaving school at 17, I made my way down the country to Wellington. Here I have been submerged in culture and connected with a wide spectrum of individuals, I am growing and discovering identities within myself and the world surrounding me through opportunities never presented before.

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Matiu Somes Island
237.130 Week 1. Biography of A.Wu