237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Works Cited

  • Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See The World. London: Pelican, 2015. 1-27. Print
  • Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. “Introduction”. Practices Of Looking; An Introduction To Visual Culture.: New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 1-5. Print.
  • Clarke, Michael. “Language and Meaning.” Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. Lausanne, Switzerland: A V A Publishing, 2007. 20-27.
  • Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. “Critical Thinking.” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.
  • Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson ed. N.Z., 2009. 15-39. Print.
  • Ruszkiewicz, John J,. Daniel Anderson, and Christy Friend. “Reading texts.” Beyond Words: Cultural texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. 9-39. Print.
  • Wellington City Council, Courtenay Place Park. “Courtenay Place Park”, “Current Exhibition”. Web. 16/03/16.
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237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Works Cited

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft3

Undergoing critical thinking and looking closely at visual texts is important to art and design practices as they allow us to look beneath just the surface meaning to achieve a greater understanding of the art. Critical thinking also facilitates rational decision-making which is crucial when we are confronted with visual texts that are difficult to interpret.

As aspiring artists and designers, it’s fair to say critical thinking and looking closely is a key part of the enhancement of our visual skill set. The closer we look, the more details we notice, by doing this we maximize our exposure to images and ideas, which we can later draw from for inspiration or even support when interpreting other artworks. The more exposure we get the more open minded we become, it’s a learning process through experience and personal connections, Ruszkiewicz states we each find different things in visual text and react to them differently. Both looking and thinking critically it requires active consideration and engagement with the visual text in order to grip full comprehension. The critical thinking process according to Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright, “Critical thinking”  is about identifying, analysing, reasoning with and evaluating the visual text

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237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft3

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft2

Undergoing critical thinking and looking closely at visual texts is important to art and design practices as they allow us to look beneath just the surface meaning to achieve a greater understanding of the art. Critical thinking also facilitates rational decision-making which is crucial when we are confronted with visual texts that are difficult to interpret.

As aspiring artists and designers, it’s fair to say critical thinking and looking closely is a key part of the enhancement of our visual skill set. The closer we look, the more details we notice, by doing this we maximize our exposure to images and ideas, which we can later draw from for inspiration or even support when interpreting other artworks. The critical thinking process is about identifying, analysing, then reasoning and evaluating the visual text (Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillipa Bright. “Critical thinking”). 

Continue reading “237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft2”

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft2

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft1

Recap of notes, key points, quotes of importance

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See The World. London: Pelican, 2015. 1-27. Print

  • Blue Marble image 1972 (Apollo 17) – perspective and connectivity
  • Blue Marble image 2012 (NASA) – Tiled rendering
  • Hodhise, “Untitled”, selfie.
  • Universal medium of internet, power of the internet, the quantity, and the geographic extent
  • Global network’s main use is the sharing of photographs, videos, comics, art and animations. World connectivity.
  • Capturing and sharing moments with images is an effort to understand the changing world surrounding us and where we belong in it.
  • There are both the visible and invisible aspects
  • Active engagement creates change

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237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Draft1

237.130_A1_W3_Task 2_ Writing Response

Option B.

Comprehension; 

The viewpoint the authors present is more or less a black and white approach, it’s a simplified and easy to understand stance on critical thinking. Creative thinking, analyzing, problem-solving, reasoning, and evaluating are the five categories discussed. The authors exhibit just how evolutionary the power of knowledge and thinking against the grain can be. As an aspiring creative, problem-solving and creative thinking is a major part of the creative process. Exposure to other people idea’s and reasonings is a way of learning, it has the ability to change the way we think and eventually help us to become a better thinker. In addition, to the subjects covered, i think they should touch base on the overlapping of categories as often we use a mixture when seeking a resolution.

The author’s voice; 

The voice throughout has quite a stern, authoritative, almost forceful tone, that is often strongly supported with evidence; examples, facts etc. There is also heavy use of collective pronouns; “people”, “we”, “they”, i assume this is an attempt to engage with the audience. The authors position themselves in an assertive position, they refer to the audience directly as “you”, i personally think they talk as if they are superior. The text in itself was easy enough to understand as well as informative, valid points were made with supporting evidence. I found the text to be a good read, it was appropriate for the topic and target audience.

237.130_A1_W3_Task 2_ Writing Response

237.130_A1_W3_Task 1_Writing Response

Explain why context is important to looking and thinking critically about a visual text

Visual texts are often reflections of their current context, whether it be social, political or environmental. The context of a visual text is key to achieving a deeper, more enhanced comprehension. It is also key to critical thinking as it allows you to focus and acknowledge significant details. Both looking and thinking critically require active consideration and engagement with the visual text, without context it’s hard to pinpoint the true meaning and purpose of it.

237.130_A1_W3_Task 1_Writing Response

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Revised Glossary

Context (revised definition)

Who? What? Where? When? Why? Context is the surroundings of the object, person, or place, it helps us understand visual text by making connections to the world and us, the audience. Context refers to the reason and goals behind the creation. There is no wrong and right with context, as it is always changing with the world, context is based on our own understanding of the world and the personal experiences we have been through, thus meaning each person will interpret and react in unique ways.

Context in Ruszkiewicz, et al. “Reading Texts”. Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. 32-34. Print. 21.03.2016

Syntax

This refers to the placement and arrangements of words in a sentence.

Glossaries and Language in Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas”. Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore. NZ.: Pearson Ed. N.Z., 2009. Print. 32. 21/03/2016

237.130_A1_W3_Task 3_Revised Glossary