237.131 – Week 4

1.) Choose one term from Moko Mead’s “Ngā Pūtanga o te tikanga: Underlying principals and values”, paraphrase this and explain how it can be applied to art/design. Use citations carefully to differentiate Meads ideas from your own (100 words).

Moko Mead in “Ngā Pūtanga o te Tikanga” states Tapū is the most important element. The notion of Tapū refers to the sacred and religious thought Maori custom holds. Mead suggests Tapū integrates different philosophies and makes an attempt to reconcile apparent contradictions, as well as being strongly connected to the mana of a person. Religion is often intertwined in toi through symbolism and representation, in turn, Tapū is also laced throughout toi. Mead suggests high levels of Tapū are dangerous, tikianga is used to monitor the levels of dangerous Tapū until a “state of ea” is reached (state of peace/equality). Over time, Tikanga and the rules of Tapū have changed, however, the significance of Tapū still remains as it enhances and deepens the process of toi, adding significance and value to the toi itself.

2.) Explain one way intellectual property and copyright laws are insufficient to address the misuse of taonga works. Use “Taonga works and intellectual property” to inform your response, including quotes and citations where appropriate (100 words).

The Copyright act exemplified in “Taonga works and intellectual property” permits the artist or creator to hold the “rights to exploit the work”.  The copyright owner is able to exclude others from their work and control the uses, this includes publishing and copying. However, work in public spaces are excluded from the act, despite The Treaty of Waitangi’s reference to taonga works being protected. This results in works like Whare Whakairo being  unprotected from misuse. “Taonga works that are displayed in a public place but not protected by copyright can be freely copied anyway.” Consequently the creators and artists lose important kaitiakitanga.

Works cited

Mead, Hirini Moko. “Chapter 2: Ngā Pūtake o te Tikanga – Underlying Principles And Values”. Tikanga Māori: Living By Māori Values. Aotearoa: Huia Publishers, 2003. 25-34. Print.

“Taonga Works and Intellectual Property.” Ko Aotearoa Tēnei: Te Taumata Tuatahi: A Report into Claims concerning New Zealand Law and Policy Affecting Māori Culture and Identity. Wellington, N.Z.: Legislation Direct, 2011. 29-59. Print.

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237.131 – Week 4

237.131 – Week 3

Choose one example of art or design made during one of the first three periods of New Zealand art history as defined by Hirini Moko Mead (Ngā Kākano – the seeds – (circa 900 to 1200 CE); Te Tipunga – the growth (1200 to 1500 CE); Te Puawaitanga – the flowering (1500–1800 AD)). Upload an image for this example. Identify one aspect of the example’s form that directly relates to its context/art historical period. Describe the example, its context, and the relationship between the form and the context in detail (150 – 200 words).

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Haumi. 1975. Aotea Utanganui Museum, South Taranaki. Photo: Richard Wotton.

This Haumi (cover) was used to protect water from entering the canoe prow. Although it was only discovered in 1975, radiocarbon suggests the pieces date back to the 15th century.

In Tangata Whenua by Anderson, Binney and Harris, the study of “tangible but anonymous remains from the past” such as the Haumi is referred to as archaeology, this is important as it provides insight into the past. Archaeology creates “cultural sequence” which directly corresponds to history (73).

As defined by Hirini Moko Mead, 1200 to 1500 CE was Te Tipunga “the growth”, 1500–1800 AD was Te Puawaitanga “the flowering”, the temporal overlap during the 15th century suggests variation in “mainland New Zealand” such as ecological and cultural change (73).

Such variation in culture can be exemplified in the patterning on the Haumi as it displays the development from “geometric ancestral East Polynesian” carving to “curvilinear forms of the late Maori era”. The integration of carving styles on the vast surface differ from much smaller traditional intricate pieces such as a Hei Tiki. Taking into consideration the changing environment of the time, the Haumi indicates a transitional period in carving as well as the Tangata Whenua (people of the land) (73).

Works cited – Harris, Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney and Aroha. “Ancient Origins.” Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History. New Zealand: Bridget Williams, 2012. 40-95. Print.

237.131 – Week 3

237.131 – Week 2

Select an art or design example from the first chapter of Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History, “Ancient Origins” (2014). Upload an image of this example to your blog and write 150-200 words explaining why this example is important. Use Athol Anderson’s text to support your claims.

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Female Deity from Raivavae. N.d. Pukaki Trust, Austral Islands. Tangata Whenua. N.p.: Bridget Williams, n.d. 19. Print.

This carved wooden figure taking shape of a human is known as the Tiki. A more symmetrical “Hei tiki” (Maori) originates from this. The Tiki originated in Eastern Polynesia more than 800 years ago. Tikis are of significance as they provide important insight into Polynesia’s early spiritual culture and dominant ideology of the time and the influence it had on New Zealand.

The Tiki is seen as a “guardian”, it possesses a greater power. It is not only seen as protection but also a way to connect to those who passed, the tiki is described in 1777 by Anderson as a “memorial to those whom they held most dear” (40). The Tiki is highly valued to the Polynesians as it holds a sacred bond between man and spirit.

As Polynesian seafarers were the first to inhabit New Zealand 800 years ago, they were the forebearers of our history. “They connected their ancestry to an extraordinary past in which myth became, by degrees, the mother of history”. From the “spirit land chronicles of Hawaiki” and Maui fishing up the islands to the powerful Tiki, Polynesian culture was intertwined with a higher spiritual realm and implemented into early New Zealand through myths and their ancestral culture (16).

The Tiki is still of spiritual significance, “It remains a symbol that speaks of these islands, as historical taonga, as high art, and within popular culture” (40).

Work cited – Anderson, Atholl, Judith Binney, and Aroha Harris. Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History. New Zealand: Bridget Williams, 2012. Print.

237.131 – Week 2

237.130_A3_W13_Final work

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Wu, Annie
“Hit”
8. June. 2016
Stencil.

The topic i chose to tackle was police brutality, in particular, the Black Lives Matter Movement. This movement stems from decades of institutionalised racism and white supremacy, it seeks to end the inequality that hinders our societies. BLM is often seen as exclusive to one race, but in reality, it represents all who are treated or have been treated unequally. Street art was my method of visual activism, i wanted to use a medium which encompasses all classes. The angel represents innocence and death, while the bullseye clearly communicates “target”. White and black representing races, and red representing the blood shed. After all, we all bleed the same colour.

237.130_A3_W13_Final work

237.130_A3_W12_Publishable blog post

My work responds to police brutality, i was heavily inspired by the #BlackLivesMatter movement. The movement is important as it provides clear evidence of the discrimination and inequality against African Americans within the States. BLM is a representative collective which supports all unequal groups. Matt McGorry tweeted “BlackLivesMatter doesn’t mean other lives don’t. Like people who say “Save The Rainforests” aren’t saying “Fuck All Other Types of Forests”. The movement seeks to diminish the unequal treatment of those deemed less worthy as well as the dismantling of institutional racism and white supremacy, BLM “breaks the cycle of violence and silence” according to CNN.

According to Funk & Wagnalls police brutality is often categorised in “two forms: excessive force or unnecessary force”. BLM also raises awareness against the discrimination and fascist ideals which burden our era. Ben Shapiro exemplifies the use of fear, threat of force, and violence that equip today’s modern bully e.g. police. The consequences of power misuse and ill handling is exemplified in the deaths of African Americans such as Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, Walter Scott, Freddie Gray and Sandra Bland, just to name a few.

#BLM creates a communication channel from the centre of the issue to the outside world. According to The Centre For American Progress “people of color are significantly overrepresented” in the U.S. prison population, making up more than “60 percent of the people behind bars”. Statistics also point towards a disproportionate amount of affect towards Coloured people in the so-called “drug war”. As a collective global society, we all hold a proportion of social responsibility that is suppose to prevent such matters from developing and corrupting. Mirzoeff describes visual activism as the conversion of pixels to actions, #BlackLivesMatter does exactly just that. By creating an online presence, most notably on Twitter, they enabled themselves to be in two places at once, they created a global and local figure. Using the rapid expansion of social media, they chose a platform that appealed to the younger population – the leaders of tomorrow. As the online presence spilled out onto the streets, visual activism was undertaken (297).

igcaiwbi.jpgBanksy. If Graffiti Changed Anything. Digital image. Unurth. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 June 2016.

The illegality of street art stems from the power of the medium, street art reaches all classes of society, it stimulates viewing from beyond the walls of a gallery. It places art into context. Street artists like Banksy, Sampsa, and Ganzeer observe, analyse, and reflect today’s world, their work provokes thought in an immediate context. Mirzoeff calls the suppression of street art, Artocracy (261), one can only assume this is an attempt to retain power over the people. After all, anything that has a cause and effect has the power to sway people’s opinions and thoughts, thus in turn out powering the government and authorities. Street art’s power will always remain with the people, the bigger the audience the bigger the effect.

IMG_9946.JPGWu, Annie. Bullseye Angel. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 June 2016.

The idea behind my work is to create a stencil set signifying the innocence of those unarmed and fatally shot. The angel represents youth and innocence in death, the bullseye refers to the police officers mentality. The restricted usages of white and black represents race, and the bold red represents blood. The unity of the colours was inspired by the line – we all bleed the same colour. Using a stencil allows the artwork to be reproduced in different areas, thus raising more awareness against the issue of police brutality.

Continue reading “237.130_A3_W12_Publishable blog post”

237.130_A3_W12_Publishable blog post

237.130_A3_W11_WORK BOOK PART 11

Creative work – planning

5 minute brainstorm

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Stencil sketches – i have decided to use a baby to represent innocence -> unarmed victims.

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IMG_9777Composition work – Use of bullseye to represent shooting.

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Artist models 

Sampsa

original.jpgSampsa. Mural in support of Egypt in Brooklyn, N.Y.. Digital image. Huffington Post. N.p., 18 May 2014. Web. 8 June 2016. 

  • Yellow the colour of sickness -> translates to weak?
  • Use of gun target – protesters and students are being targeted and shot
  • Reference to “hands up don’t shoot”
  • Peace signs – not here for violence, not here with the intention to harm

Ganzeer – http://www.ganzeer.com

img_9375Ganzeer. Mural. Digital image. The Times For A Feast. Abdelrhman Zin Eldin, May 2014. Web. 8 June 2016.

  • Zombie solider -> soldiers who have no mind of their own, they just shoot for the sake of it.
  • Infectious / contagious
  • Skulls represent death
  • Pile of skulls representative of lots of death
  • Yellow and red colour = Hot, heated, intense.

Banksy – http://banksy.co.uk

police-no-evil-banksyBanksy. See No Evil. Digital image. Flickr. N.p., 23 July 2011. Web. 8 June 2016. 

  • Reference to wise monkeys
  • See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.
  • Reflection of todays force
  • Political
  • Black and white, very matter of fact
  • Corruption
237.130_A3_W11_WORK BOOK PART 11

237.130_A3_W11_Publishable blog post

Question – with supporting evidence (research and images of art/design practices)

What is #blacklivesmatter and what does it communicate about our global society?

Throughout American history, discrimination has hindered the devolvement of safe and equal societies, in particular, the discriminations towards African American communities has had a substantial impact. #BLM creates a communication channel from the centre of the issue to the outside, it creates awareness regarding police brutality and begins to dismantle institutional racism and white supremacy. According to The Centre For American Progress, “people of colour are significantly overrepresented” in the U.S. prison population, making up more than 60 percent of the people behind bars”. Statistics also point towards a disproportionate amount of affect towards Coloured people in the so-called “drug war”. As a collective global society, we all hold a proportion of social responsibility that is suppose to prevent such matters from developing and corrupting. #BlackLivesMatter speaks for all inequality, and through education, it generates change.

Taking advantage of the rise of social media #BlackLivesMatter created a platform appealing to the younger generations, the generations that would eventually run today’s society. In an effort to create change, it must start with the children of the world – the leaders of tomorrow. The creation of #BlackLivesMatter was founded on Twitter, after “trending”, the movement gained momentum and soon became a heavily publicised movement which eventually outstretched to far corners of the world. The sheer mass of supporters created a sense of safety in numbers, the collective power of people’s voices is more influential than any medium.

002_rdny.jpgBanksy. Piñata. Digital image. Banksy. Banksy, n.d. Web. 8 June 2016.

This artwork by Banksy represents the maltreatment of Rodney King, who was violently beaten by LAPD, and recorded by witnesses. On the 20th anniversary of King’s beating, Bansky reproduced a screenshot in a similar fashion to the recording.

Banksy uses the Piñata to represent King, Banksy encourages the reflection of the incident as well as the “dehumanisation of others leads to self-dehumanization”. The police are seen in a position of power, they out number and tower over the piñata, signifying vulnerability. Stencil revolution states, “The different colors on the pinata represent how people of all colors become victims of the erosion of civil liberties”.

igcaiwbiBanksy. If Graffiti Changed Anything. Digital image. Unurth. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 June 2016.

The illegality of street art stems from the power of the medium, street art is able to reach all classes of society, it stimulates viewing from beyond the blank cube walls of a gallery. It places art into context, rather than the other way round. Street artists observe, analyse, and reflect the context and surroundings today, their work provokes thought in an immediate context. The suppression of street art is an attempt to retain power over the people, anything that has a cause and effect has the power to sway people’s opinions and thoughts, thus in turn dangerous for a government’s regime. Street art’s power remains with the people, the bigger the audience the bigger the effect, and thus setting the wheels of change in motion.

Works cited

“LAPD Pinata by Banksy.” Stencil Revolution. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 June 2016.
“8 Facts You Should Know About the Criminal Justice System and People of Color.” Name. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 June 2016.
Harrington, Jaime Rojo & Steven. “The Power of Color Via Street Art, Graffiti and Murals.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, n.d. Web. 07 June 2016.
237.130_A3_W11_Publishable blog post